Writing 20th Century Pulp Fiction in the 21st Century

I have come to realise that as a writer, there is a style I gravitate towards. I don’t pretend to be highbrow or sophisticated like somebody who went to a particular university, or had a privileged education. I do not have airs and graces. I write about what I find interesting, and entertaining. I weave tales that are not over complicated, but have enough spice (I hope) to turn a page. So, what is it that drives my interests? What is it that makes me return to a genre that is full of those things that so called “polite” society call taboo?

It’s that boyish sense of adventure. I am quite clearly a little immature. I want to be titilated, and experience danger, lust and crime. I want to be the sheriff or the man in the black hat as you would see in a classic Western. I want to be a Gangster, or a super sleuth. I want to sleep with the Femme Fatale, although it could be the death of me – and so it goes on.

Pulp Fiction, is where its at. You escape into the underbelly of life and experience a grittiness that is equally alluring as it is distasteful. The tales can appeal to our most basic instincts. But they also serve as a quick escape from the real world. Where the mundane existence of life seems to crowd in. I think that a great pulp tale from the 20th century provides a portal to life that has a glamour that isn’t as obvious in life today. Interaction between characters is vital, and at a time when distancing yourself from others can be seen as important, so these interactions jump off a page.

So, for me writing within this genre seems a natural fit. I don’t just stick to the formula though. I experiment and provide stories that have enough familiarity that you want to read, but are also different in structure. My Pulp Fiction Poetry for example has a lyricism that helps convey mood, rhythm and a musicality.

Whereas my prose embraces many different genres so as to try and create something original. That is the crux though. How do you provide something that hasn’t been done before? Well you don’t. You go with your instincts. You write about things you are interested in, and hope others are as well. You pick the elements you like, you absorb ideas from around you – on the Internet, in books, on film or even on the radio. Then you regurgitate it in a new way. Taking things forward in the manner that storytellers do.

It’s hard work being a 20th century Pulp Fiction writer in the 21st century. But it continues as an accessible entertainment, and tradition that is there to be enjoyed.

I have written two novels and two Pulp Fiction Poetry collections. This year I hope to complete a third novel and a third Pulp Fiction Poetry collection. I am pretty sure these won’t be my last. It seems I am on a road of my own choosing, where story telling is my thing. So if you want to dig my work check it out at the various online platforms it is available from:

Amazon,

Apple.

Barnes & Noble

Kobo

and

Lulu.com

Watch this space for my forthcoming projects – including news about my first non fiction book.

Kindest regards readers. Stay safe

Jason Disley.

A Pint Of Bitter, and Pulp Fictions

It’s been a week, since I last posted anything. Last Monday I mentioned various book releases I have made available as ebooks. Such as my novella Seven Day Fool, which is now available via iBooks

https://books.apple.com/us/book/seven-day-fool/id1505606104

and my first Pulp Fiction Poetry collection – Beat To A Pulp which is also now available via iBooks

Beat To A Pulp by Jason Disley

https://books.apple.com/us/book/beat-to-a-pulp/id1505713274

As well as releasing these books, in the last week I have written an article for Zani, which is an online magazine with articles covering a wide range of topics. The article I wrote was titled A Pint Of Bitter, Bound To Be A Good Thing… And was About British Jazz icon Tubby Hayes, and a new limited edition book that has been published by Mono Media Books. In the article I interview the main man behind the project-Mark Baxter, who is an author and film producer, amongst other things.

Tubby Hayes

You can read that article here, and if you are interested in this book about the British Jazz legend. You can follow the link for more information at the end of the article.

https://www.zani.co.uk/zani-music/item/3068-tubby-hayes-a-pint-of-bitter-bound-to-be-a-good-thing

So, as you can see – I have been fairly busy. However, the main thing I wish to bring to your attention is my new paperback that has been released – it is titled – Angel In Alabaster,

Angel In Alabaster the new book by Jason Disley is out now.

and is the sequel to Beat To A Pulp. It is a book I am very pleased with and continues with the theme of writing a prose tale in verse form. My interest in Pulp Fiction and Film Noir is very apparent in this book, and it contains moments that feel familiar, and comfortable within the environment of the tale. In fact. An up and coming writer – who is very hip to the world’s I allude to in the book has written a foreword to the book, which I feel gives the reader an insight into what Pulp Fiction Poetry, Or Film Noir Verse is. Here is that foreword:

FOREWORD

It’s a pulp world. A space where people make shapes, alloyed by desire. It’s where Exterior means: “I need to get from Point A to B, with a direct response,” as Interior leaves us groping for dark epithets with one hand, while knocking back a boiler maker with the other.
Jason Disley knows this world like the back of his hand. Read The Angel in Alabaster and you’ll be on several fifth drinking terms with it. It’s a warm enough room; a bourbon haze, a nascent lounge lizard on the Wurlitzer and a Turkish delight scarlet hue in the furnishing. Pick through the Fry’s, expect to stumble upon some ebon promise.
Loretta, Johnny, The Artisan: all creations unique to Jason’s palette – the wasp’s sting here is in their familiarity. The initial impact of The Angel in Alabaster comes from this sense of ironic comfort. For a long time fan of the novels of Raymond Chandler, the songs of Johnny Mercer and the silhouette of Gene Tierney, reading words that invoke 1940s LA hums the same heat as Vernon Duke’s mellow Manhattan Fall: “Glittering crowds (…) In canyons of steel / They’re making me feel I’m home.” But, as a later poet of sky rises observed, It’s also where the hatred is.
The Angel in Alabaster has a raison d’etre supplanted from a previous work, Beat to a Pulp: a juxtaposition of the argot of gumshoes and cheese cakes with the ennui of the verse styling found in T. S. Eliot’s 1920s modernism. In laymen’s terms, this is a way of depicting a story filled with the pulse of hard boiled sensuality, through a poetic metre impressing ‘hip’ speech rhythms, for those of a Spillane bent, at the same time as employing strong rhymes to locate a subtle sense of the universality of Noir in these Google fried times. “The stuff that dreams are made of” now so manifest that “doing a number” is as much part of the current bloodstream as a commonplace app; on its 20th Luckie for the day of course.
And this is where Jason mounts his own unique killer-diller.
Jason’s poetry in The Angel in Alabaster delves into Noir as an intrinsic part of so many of today’s cultural default mode. Sin City – look at the implied neons and Edward Hopper pallor. Peaky Blinders – the hissy darkness and ‘hat as icon’ imagery. Boardwalk Empire – well, It’s like a resort for…. Gangsters. However, Mr. Disley is anything but the lid on a semiotic dust bin. E. M. Forster told us to “only connect;” he could be describing the best way to tuck into The Angel in Alabaster’s rhyme of the non’lent gumshoe jazz riff. Dig the influences, connect the dots. How modernist.
Dot connection is indeed the thing wherein we catch the shtick of the Dis. Slang is normally habitual; It’s great paradox residing in it being always there, despite fashion making it permanently transient. Within the bounds of The Angel in Alabaster, it functions as a refining signifier, beckoning towards a signified inscribed with ‘pleasure.’ Jason’s utilisation of Eliot’s bleak poetics illustrates this best of all. Cf, The Waste Land:
She smooths her hair with automatic hand,
And puts a record on the gramophone.
‘This music crept by me upon the waters’ (…)
O City City (….)
Now ‘Angel’:
Johnny needed to shake the lead out of his shorts (….)
He would find the gator with a gat
Or the cat with a shiv
Who had decided the Lady in The Jade Dress must crowd (….)
He needed Seven to become Eleven in this crap shoot.

In The Waste Land, speech rhythm connotes towards ennui – a boredom that beckons towards an out of reach memory from a Tempest. In ‘Alabaster’, the metre is also of speech, but this time the modernist urge to make it new comes not as a lofty literary, but in a bouquet of side mouth rye. The fragments that Jason stores against The Artisan’s ruins read more like William Gottlieb’s photograph of 52nd Street: from swing to bop is the measure of Seven becoming Eleven. The Angel of Alabaster may allude to Eliot’s “a handful of dust,” in form; when read and digested, the grab is still there but definitely in a lamp gaze view – from the lipstick cap to Lana Turner’s eyes, plus John Garfield’s peak in between.
Whether you dream of Rita Hayworth or crack like Jimmy Cagney, rein in your 38. for Jason Disley’s latest invitation to the pulps. *

Nathan James Le-bas

*: All quotes from The Waste Land, The Complete Poems & Plays of T. S. Eliot (London, 1969).

Angel In Alabaster has a wonderful bookcover designed by Mark Head Aka Mr. H. Mark, designed the cover for Beat To A Pulp, and it seemed natural to ask him to design the cover for this collection.

The book is available now from

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

And soon it will be available from other online retailers such as Amazon.

Going forward, I am working on a third Film Noir Verse book, and the sequel to Seven Day Fool, titled Take It Or Leave It, this book will initially be made available as an ebook. I hope that when the time is right it will be published in paperback.

Lastly I wish to share a video of a poem I have written, that is a message for all of us at this time. As we all make our way through this Pandemic – follow the rules and keep safe. I will no doubt be sharing something else with you next Monday. JD.

Keep Your Distance

Strange Times, and opportunities.

It has been some time since I wrote anything here. For that – I apologise. Life for everyone has reached a point that is very different from the norm. I have been busy, and in the coming months will be taking the opportunity of self isolation to complete various writing projects. In fact – I am here to show you how busy I have been!

Seven Day Fool – my debut novella First published in 2017 has been made available as an ebook

Firstly I wish to announce that my debut novella Seven Day Fool which was published in paperback by Suave Collective Publishing has been released as an ebook. At this time of social distancing, many of us have more time on our hands to read. Whereas a real book to hold is preferable, digital copies are essential at this time. In a few weeks – the sequel to Seven Day Fool, a book I have titled Take It Or Leave It will make its debut as an ebook, with the hope it will be published in book form some time next year, when Covid 19 is hopefully is nothing but a memory, and life has some sort of normality with personal freedoms restored.

As well as prose, I have been writing a lot of poetry. All of which is available from Lulu. Com

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Beatnpress

Two of my poetry collections, are what I term Film Noir Verse or Pulp Fiction Poetry.

Beat To A Pulp & Angel In Alabaster by Jason Disley.

Beat To A Pulp has been available as a paperback since 2018, but, as of this week it is available as an ebook. Angel In Alabaster – a sort of sequel to Beat To A Pulp is available now from Lulu.com,

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Beatnpress

It will no doubt be available as an ebook at some point in the not too distant future.

Over the coming weeks, I will endeavour to make the majority of my books available to download. I will also take this extra time on my hands to continue to write and work on other projects.

I will also endeavour to write more articles and keep you readers informed with my writing exploits. Next week I will be writing about Speaky Blinders a Spoken Word night I Co-host with Robert Garnham, the new You Tube Channel for Speaky Blinders, and a recent digital single I have released, which is available via various platforms.

For now I say good bye, I wish you all well – and ask that you stay safe – and maybe read a book, or even write something yourself. 😊

Jason Disley.

Beat To A Pulp – A collection of Film Noir Verse

It’s Noirvember and the perfect time of year to luxuriate in the comfort of your home watching classic movies like The Big Sleep, or Key Largo, maybe Double Indemnity or other such films. Likewise you could read books by authors such Raymond Chandler, Micky Spillane or Dashiell Hammett to name but just three of the great Pulp Fiction writers out there that have influenced the Film Noir genre. Or you could dip into my book –

Beat To A Pulp.

available at Lulu. com

It’s a great slice of the Pulp genre – even if I say so myself. It has all the ingredients of Pulp Fiction and a good Film Noir. It has characters easily recognisable from the genre. Ruby the Femme Fatale, Johnny – On – The – Spot, and Jack Rabbit Blood – two rival Gangsters, and Aldous Beech the hardboiled detective. But, this book is a Pulp Fiction with a difference. It is written to the rhythms of Jazz, and flows in verse form. It is a form of prose/poetry. Each snippet leads to the next, as each “poem” is read in order – so a film noir reveals itself in the readers imagination. It isn’t poetry that provokes deep thought. It is poetry for pleasure. It’s story telling in a way that is perhaps a little different from your normal book.

I am proud of it, and hope that should anyone buy a copy that they enjoy it. It’s an original tale, but has a familiarity about it. It will hopefully be appreciated like a favourite classic movie or a thrilling detective story.

Since the books release on Lulu earlier this month. I have been performing some of the poems.

It allows me to get my creation out to a different audience. It’s title Beat To A Pulp is obvious. I am after all a poet who enjoys performing. This book is my concept album. It’s full of Jazz and tells a story.

Here is a snippet from the book:

Doing A Number by Jason Disley – taken from Beat To A Pulp

Jason Disley reading from his new book Beat To A Pulp

The book is currently in the global reach system and will be available in paperback from Amazon and other online retailers soon There are also plans for an ebook version in the New Year.

If you want a copy for Christmas for someone- to guarantee it’s delivery please order direct from Lulu (see the available at Lulu link above) updates on other retailers will be announced in future posts.

In the meantime enjoy the rest of Noirvember. Thanks for reading Jason Disley.

Beat To A Pulp, and Jazzy numbers.

I have been busy. Extremely busy. Last month saw my run of poetry performances hitting an all time high. So much so – I haven’t posted anything here for while. For that I can only apologise. Having performed in Torquay, Paignton, Newton Abbot and a gig in Birmingham it is a wonder I have had time to focus on other things. But I am pleased to say I have. I have been adding the final touches to my new book which will be available soon. My book is a poetry collection that is different from anything else I have ever written. It is a complete Pulp Fiction tale told in verse form.

Here is the blurb from the back cover:

“In this, epic collection, Disley has conjured up a cast of characters that shimmer, dodge and thrill the page with a story straight out of storyvile”

SJ Knight – Crime Fiction Writer

Firmly set in the period of Pulp and Noir of the twentieth century in an unnamed American city- Beat To A Pulp delivers poetry that’s full of the jive talk you would expect to read in Hammett, Chandler and Spillane.

It’s a Beat Poet delivering his version of a Pulp Fiction. It’s straight from the fridge and if you’ve got your boots on, you will dig the jive and imagine what happens when the canary sings.

The book is published by Beatnpress.

Now that the book is practically complete, it’s forty poems, are also ready to be performed and on the 14th of this month I will be debuting a handful of the poems from this collection. If you are a fan of Pulp Fiction, and Film Noir like I am. You will know that Jazz is often associated with the movies, and tales in the Pulp oeuvre. So naturally as my thoughts move towards performing and breathing life into the poems. I immediately felt it was right to have some suitable jazz to play in the back ground whilst reading. Enhancing the experience and hopefully allowing for a Film Noir to play in the minds of the audience.

So I have made a suitable Spotify playlist. It is only short and comprises of just three tunes.

1) Main Title by Gerry Mulligan

2)Private Investigator by Graham De Wilde

3) Gumshoe Blues by Paul Pritchard.

You can listen to the playlist here:

Beat To A Pulp Tracks

No doubt as I add more of the poems to the performances I will add more music to the playlist.

The debut performance will be at Word Command at Zitas in Exeter.

If things develop as I hope I would love to turn this collection into a play also. To see the characters come to life would be incredible. It would also be another string to add to my writing bow. But for now I am just so happy to share that this collection is going to be available to read soon. The book cover has been designed by Mr. H. He has also provided six images within the collection to accompany the poetry. Mr H. also designed the cover to my debut novella Seven Day Fool.

Mr H Design Co

More news about Beat To A Pulp soon…

Beat To A Pulp

The Beat To A Pulp Poetry Project is an experimentation of verse written in the style of a complete and original pulp Fiction tale by Jason Disley. It is a series of forty poems that when read in order they will tell a story.

The story is of a small time crook called Johnny On The Spot, his infatuation for a beautiful female Jazz Singer called Ruby – who is in a relationship with Jack Rabbit Blood the local mobster who really shouldn’t be crossed. Johnny On The Spot decides that he really must be with Ruby and believes that he can only get her by becoming as powerful as Jack Rabbit Blood. What ensues is a tale that is a tale of lust, violence, Jazz and prohibition in an unnamed American city. There is a grizzled Detective too. So all the elements of a great Pulp Fiction story.

Here is the first poem:

Johnny- On -The- Spot

At the Trottery

Dancing on a dime

feeling

Dead on time

with enough bread to burn a wet mule

Giggle water washing it down

Gin Mill Cowboys watching on

As the Honky tonk angel clings like a rash

Johnny- On – The -Spot

Eyeballs

The Jack Rabbit Blood at the end of the bar.

The Gator revealing a Gat

Time to do a Houdini

Time to Agitate the gravel

Johnny -On – The -Spot

Jazz Baby want’s to jitterbug

Now is not the time to

Get wise

It’s a natural gas that you can’t

Zig a Zag

Now is not the time to

Shake the polish off your shoes!

Johnny -On – The -Spot

Jack Rabbit Blood

Has got the blast on you

Cut the scene!

Johnny

You don’t want to be On – The- Spot no more.

It’s a foul up!

From soup to nuts

Gorilla Jack Rabbit Blood

Has a Moth’s chance in a nudist colony

if

You

Noodle it out.

Miss

Throwing lead

Fly it through to endsville

Bump

Jack Rabbit Blood

Another time.

when its his

turn

to

be

Johnny -On -The – Spot

Written by Jason Disley

The plan for the project is to eventually get it published with a collection of original images. If you go to The Beat To A Pulp Poetry Project you will find the collection on Facebook, where most of the poems are available to read. Naturally the end has not been revealed yet as this is being withheld until publication.

For now I will close this blog with the second poem within this collection – allowing you another taste of what has been so far a very interesting project and one that will one day be complete and ready to share.

Jack Rabbit Blood

Jack Rabbit Blood

The man is up to no good

He is the

Iceman

Cometh the hour

A Gator with a Gat

Who with a smile

Puts lead buttons in your vest

Avoiding

The

Hot Squat

And

Being fried

In that powerful chair

He sips juice in his

Cellar bar lair

Knowing he can not be

Fingered for a certain crime.

The Witch with the sleek chassis

Turns her lamps on him

As another bulb

In

The neon night

Blows out.

Written by Jason Disley