The Lost Notes reveal more than you think.

Some of The Lost Notes

When the new book by Diz was conceived it was after the discovery of many pieces of writing had been found in a box at the back of a cupboard. Writing that had been written a long time ago. Some of it was even over twenty years old! Half written projects, ideas that had been quickly noted down – but were not fully formed. None of it was a cohesive narrative. Taking the concept of William Burroughs cut ups – it was decided to take these many separate themes and ideas and create something new. Creating a character that linked the different mediums together, and with that character being a jazz musician – so the concept of composing came to mind. Like any piece of Jazz there are those moments that hook you in, and take you on a journey – and then the tune can take you off on different tangents with improvised moments before returning to its main theme. This is exactly what The Lost Notes hopes to achieve, and so far the initial feedback from those who have been fortunate to read pre release copies the concept has indeed created something that is both different and entertaining.

Gary Malby from Gama Clothing had the pleasure of reading The Lost Notes, and his reaction was everything Diz hoped. Gary is a clued up guy with a broad knowledge of music, style and culture. His site sells a range of t shirts, accessories and books to people who have interests in British subcultures, music and modernist ideals based around living a full life. He stated it is

‘Like a Blue Note Revisited album, the sights and sounds are familiar and classic, but with a brand new twist baby! A great tonic for the instant throwaway culture and a great read’

Gary Malby @gamaclothing

Another recipient of a pre release copy was Jason Brummell. Jason is an author in his own right, and has been called the leader in modernist fiction thanks to two seminal books and a raft of articles. His books All About My Girl and All or Nothing being cited as two of the best tales depicting the modernist experience in 60s Britain. In fact his work has spurred other people to take up the challenge of creating fiction and his encouragement of other writers is to be highly commended. His reaction to the pre release copy was also glowing.

“A highly entertaining lysergic flight of fantasy across the astral planes. An energetic rollercoaster of voodoo, jazz, Jim Morrison and the power of spirituality. As inventive and as original as a solo by the master himself, Dizzy Gillespie.”

Jason Brummell, Author.

Jason’s reaction sum up the book succinctly. For all the elements he mentions are indeed in the tale. It mixes creativity with a fantasy that evolves, and as it does it enters other realms of existence and deals with spirituality, death and magic. Its a potent mix that conjures up an original tale that is as the author hopes – refreshingly different.

Another, and the final endorsement for this forthcoming Beatnpress publication is from Detail Magazine’s Claire Mahoney. As an editor and writer herself – her reaction to the book was one that ‘Diz’ hoped would be positive and insightful. Diz needn’t have worried. She stated:

“If Jack Kerouac and Carlos Castaneda went on a road trip together, you would probably wind up with something not dissimilar to The Lost Notes. A beguiling transatlantic tale of jazz, spiritualism and Jim Morrison ” Claire Mahoney, Detail magazine

Claire Mahoney, Detail magazine

In all this experimental novella that mixes poetry, prose, screen writing, music and images together achieves what it set out to do. It is a book that is not only entertaining, but explores composition, structure and a mixed media approach to provide something that is just different enough that the experience itself is original and new. It’s a true trip with a jazz element. If it was a piece of music it could be termed Acid Jazz, but as it is a form of literature it’s a modernist beat book for the soul.

The Lost Notes by Diz will be available to pre- order from http://www.beatnpress.co.uk on the 24th of October for £10.99

A book with a difference – The Lost Notes by Diz – As inventive and original as a piece of jazz.

Creating something that is both original and different is no easy task these days. It can sometimes feel like everything has been done before, and to some degree that is true. The Lost Notes by Diz is a book that sees the author approach his topic in a creative form that is- well – not typical. There is an affinity for Jazz in the creation of the novel – but not in the long unpunctuated style and rhythms of the original Beat writer, Jack Kerouac. No. This book has themes running through it, ideas that are interesting tangents, and distractions, yet will return to its main theme. Much like the improvisation you would find in Jazz music. It’s novel approach creates a tale that is modern, yet has enough familiarity in it that it is still entertaining. There is in fact a point where the novel explores the ideas of clichés and whether both the book and the protagonist needs to use them. The layered approach allows the reader to enter the realms that are created. As fellow author Jason Brummell, ( All About My Girl and All Or Nothing) says – it is

“A highly entertaining lysergic flight of fantasy across the astral planes. An energetic rollercoaster of voodoo, jazz, Jim Morrison and the power of spirituality. As inventive and as original as a solo by the master himself, Dizzy Gillespie.”

Using poetry, prose, screenwriting, images and other creative elements it generates an almost fragmented trip into both reality and the fantastical that serves to echo its contents. The tale is also the result of twenty years of discarded ideas and notes that have never been published before. When the notes and discarded manuscripts were found they were edited and spliced together in yet another inspirational cut up style creating a completely new and original narrative.

As yet it is uncertain whether there will be a second tale. Diz is both a construct and a psuedonym – Should there be another though. It will certainly be another great addition to the Beatnpress library.

The Lost Notes will be available for pre orders from October 24th 2021 via http://www.beatnpress.co.uk

A Pint Of Bitter, and Pulp Fictions

It’s been a week, since I last posted anything. Last Monday I mentioned various book releases I have made available as ebooks. Such as my novella Seven Day Fool, which is now available via iBooks

https://books.apple.com/us/book/seven-day-fool/id1505606104

and my first Pulp Fiction Poetry collection – Beat To A Pulp which is also now available via iBooks

Beat To A Pulp by Jason Disley

https://books.apple.com/us/book/beat-to-a-pulp/id1505713274

As well as releasing these books, in the last week I have written an article for Zani, which is an online magazine with articles covering a wide range of topics. The article I wrote was titled A Pint Of Bitter, Bound To Be A Good Thing… And was About British Jazz icon Tubby Hayes, and a new limited edition book that has been published by Mono Media Books. In the article I interview the main man behind the project-Mark Baxter, who is an author and film producer, amongst other things.

Tubby Hayes

You can read that article here, and if you are interested in this book about the British Jazz legend. You can follow the link for more information at the end of the article.

https://www.zani.co.uk/zani-music/item/3068-tubby-hayes-a-pint-of-bitter-bound-to-be-a-good-thing

So, as you can see – I have been fairly busy. However, the main thing I wish to bring to your attention is my new paperback that has been released – it is titled – Angel In Alabaster,

Angel In Alabaster the new book by Jason Disley is out now.

and is the sequel to Beat To A Pulp. It is a book I am very pleased with and continues with the theme of writing a prose tale in verse form. My interest in Pulp Fiction and Film Noir is very apparent in this book, and it contains moments that feel familiar, and comfortable within the environment of the tale. In fact. An up and coming writer – who is very hip to the world’s I allude to in the book has written a foreword to the book, which I feel gives the reader an insight into what Pulp Fiction Poetry, Or Film Noir Verse is. Here is that foreword:

FOREWORD

It’s a pulp world. A space where people make shapes, alloyed by desire. It’s where Exterior means: “I need to get from Point A to B, with a direct response,” as Interior leaves us groping for dark epithets with one hand, while knocking back a boiler maker with the other.
Jason Disley knows this world like the back of his hand. Read The Angel in Alabaster and you’ll be on several fifth drinking terms with it. It’s a warm enough room; a bourbon haze, a nascent lounge lizard on the Wurlitzer and a Turkish delight scarlet hue in the furnishing. Pick through the Fry’s, expect to stumble upon some ebon promise.
Loretta, Johnny, The Artisan: all creations unique to Jason’s palette – the wasp’s sting here is in their familiarity. The initial impact of The Angel in Alabaster comes from this sense of ironic comfort. For a long time fan of the novels of Raymond Chandler, the songs of Johnny Mercer and the silhouette of Gene Tierney, reading words that invoke 1940s LA hums the same heat as Vernon Duke’s mellow Manhattan Fall: “Glittering crowds (…) In canyons of steel / They’re making me feel I’m home.” But, as a later poet of sky rises observed, It’s also where the hatred is.
The Angel in Alabaster has a raison d’etre supplanted from a previous work, Beat to a Pulp: a juxtaposition of the argot of gumshoes and cheese cakes with the ennui of the verse styling found in T. S. Eliot’s 1920s modernism. In laymen’s terms, this is a way of depicting a story filled with the pulse of hard boiled sensuality, through a poetic metre impressing ‘hip’ speech rhythms, for those of a Spillane bent, at the same time as employing strong rhymes to locate a subtle sense of the universality of Noir in these Google fried times. “The stuff that dreams are made of” now so manifest that “doing a number” is as much part of the current bloodstream as a commonplace app; on its 20th Luckie for the day of course.
And this is where Jason mounts his own unique killer-diller.
Jason’s poetry in The Angel in Alabaster delves into Noir as an intrinsic part of so many of today’s cultural default mode. Sin City – look at the implied neons and Edward Hopper pallor. Peaky Blinders – the hissy darkness and ‘hat as icon’ imagery. Boardwalk Empire – well, It’s like a resort for…. Gangsters. However, Mr. Disley is anything but the lid on a semiotic dust bin. E. M. Forster told us to “only connect;” he could be describing the best way to tuck into The Angel in Alabaster’s rhyme of the non’lent gumshoe jazz riff. Dig the influences, connect the dots. How modernist.
Dot connection is indeed the thing wherein we catch the shtick of the Dis. Slang is normally habitual; It’s great paradox residing in it being always there, despite fashion making it permanently transient. Within the bounds of The Angel in Alabaster, it functions as a refining signifier, beckoning towards a signified inscribed with ‘pleasure.’ Jason’s utilisation of Eliot’s bleak poetics illustrates this best of all. Cf, The Waste Land:
She smooths her hair with automatic hand,
And puts a record on the gramophone.
‘This music crept by me upon the waters’ (…)
O City City (….)
Now ‘Angel’:
Johnny needed to shake the lead out of his shorts (….)
He would find the gator with a gat
Or the cat with a shiv
Who had decided the Lady in The Jade Dress must crowd (….)
He needed Seven to become Eleven in this crap shoot.

In The Waste Land, speech rhythm connotes towards ennui – a boredom that beckons towards an out of reach memory from a Tempest. In ‘Alabaster’, the metre is also of speech, but this time the modernist urge to make it new comes not as a lofty literary, but in a bouquet of side mouth rye. The fragments that Jason stores against The Artisan’s ruins read more like William Gottlieb’s photograph of 52nd Street: from swing to bop is the measure of Seven becoming Eleven. The Angel of Alabaster may allude to Eliot’s “a handful of dust,” in form; when read and digested, the grab is still there but definitely in a lamp gaze view – from the lipstick cap to Lana Turner’s eyes, plus John Garfield’s peak in between.
Whether you dream of Rita Hayworth or crack like Jimmy Cagney, rein in your 38. for Jason Disley’s latest invitation to the pulps. *

Nathan James Le-bas

*: All quotes from The Waste Land, The Complete Poems & Plays of T. S. Eliot (London, 1969).

Angel In Alabaster has a wonderful bookcover designed by Mark Head Aka Mr. H. Mark, designed the cover for Beat To A Pulp, and it seemed natural to ask him to design the cover for this collection.

The book is available now from

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

And soon it will be available from other online retailers such as Amazon.

Going forward, I am working on a third Film Noir Verse book, and the sequel to Seven Day Fool, titled Take It Or Leave It, this book will initially be made available as an ebook. I hope that when the time is right it will be published in paperback.

Lastly I wish to share a video of a poem I have written, that is a message for all of us at this time. As we all make our way through this Pandemic – follow the rules and keep safe. I will no doubt be sharing something else with you next Monday. JD.

Keep Your Distance

Strange Times, and opportunities.

It has been some time since I wrote anything here. For that – I apologise. Life for everyone has reached a point that is very different from the norm. I have been busy, and in the coming months will be taking the opportunity of self isolation to complete various writing projects. In fact – I am here to show you how busy I have been!

Seven Day Fool – my debut novella First published in 2017 has been made available as an ebook

Firstly I wish to announce that my debut novella Seven Day Fool which was published in paperback by Suave Collective Publishing has been released as an ebook. At this time of social distancing, many of us have more time on our hands to read. Whereas a real book to hold is preferable, digital copies are essential at this time. In a few weeks – the sequel to Seven Day Fool, a book I have titled Take It Or Leave It will make its debut as an ebook, with the hope it will be published in book form some time next year, when Covid 19 is hopefully is nothing but a memory, and life has some sort of normality with personal freedoms restored.

As well as prose, I have been writing a lot of poetry. All of which is available from Lulu. Com

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Beatnpress

Two of my poetry collections, are what I term Film Noir Verse or Pulp Fiction Poetry.

Beat To A Pulp & Angel In Alabaster by Jason Disley.

Beat To A Pulp has been available as a paperback since 2018, but, as of this week it is available as an ebook. Angel In Alabaster – a sort of sequel to Beat To A Pulp is available now from Lulu.com,

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Beatnpress

It will no doubt be available as an ebook at some point in the not too distant future.

Over the coming weeks, I will endeavour to make the majority of my books available to download. I will also take this extra time on my hands to continue to write and work on other projects.

I will also endeavour to write more articles and keep you readers informed with my writing exploits. Next week I will be writing about Speaky Blinders a Spoken Word night I Co-host with Robert Garnham, the new You Tube Channel for Speaky Blinders, and a recent digital single I have released, which is available via various platforms.

For now I say good bye, I wish you all well – and ask that you stay safe – and maybe read a book, or even write something yourself. 😊

Jason Disley.

My Debut Album: Speakeasy

Speakeasy by Jason Disley – Available now!

It is now available! The spoken word album that began as a concept back in 2016.

When I was approached after sharing a poem on a popular social network, and asked if I would like to record something. I jumped at the opportunity. It was something that had never really crossed my mind. But, as soon as it was proposed, I thought – yes! So then Rick Blackman – the musician and producer who had proposed the idea – and I got to work on teaming up original compositions with my poetry. So it began – a fulfilling and exciting period of creativity. It was a project that was done over long distance. Rick lived up in the north west of the UK and I lived in the South West. But with the use of today’s technology we were soon able to work well together, swapping ideas and doing our best to create an interesting body of work. Both Rick and I love music and have an affinity with various styles of music. Both of us are interested in the history of British subcultures, especially the mid twentieth century. This is reflected in some of the music on the album. There are many nods to those periods. There is also a very European feel to it, and with one track – Breathless there is a real sense of French cinema in the music. In fact Breathless is read in French by Gabriela Giacoman – the lead singer of the French band French Boutik. Serge Hoffman, also of French Boutik also adds his voice at the start of the album, supplying and setting the scene with an introduction that allows the listener to imagine the album has been recorded live in a club in Paris.

To add to this, fellow writer Jason Brummell has kindly written a fictional scene as a foreword to the twelve page booklet that is included with the CD.

When Adam Cooper, the head honcho at Heavy Soul Records heard the demos and agreed to releasing the album. You can imagine how thrilled I was. This was an incredible moment. I was at the beach with my family when I received the call. You can imagine how I was when I heard the news. I was jumping up and down in my swim shorts on the beach. Onlookers probably thought I was trying to invent a new dance! I was that elated. Even with the yes, due to the schedule and the album taking its place in the run of things, it took another year for this release date to arrive. In the meantime I have worked hard at improving my craft. Becoming more comfortable with performance, (I even host a regular spoken word evening called Speaky Blinders) and have written quite prolifically. Returning to these poems will be a joy as I endeavour to share what is on the album in the coming months.

Here is just one of the tunes off the album for you

The Weekend – from Speakeasy by Jason Disley with music by Rick Blackman

Buy Speakeasy here! Heavy Soul Records

More news about Speakeasy soon.

JD.

Down At The Flamingo – Modernist Beat.

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of performing at the Torbay March Of The Mods where I performed five poems all accompanied by music. March Of The Mods is a wonderful charity event that takes place all around the country throughout March. It raises money for The Teenage Cancer Trust. So naturally it is an honour to be involved.

Billed as “The Beat Poet” I read five original poems:

The Weekend

Firecracker On My Mind

Hobo’s and Tramps

Speakeasy

And lastly

Down At The Flamingo.

This last poem is a firm favourite of mine.

It’s about those who used to venture to the famous Flamingo Jazz Club

In the 1960s. Which was situated on Wardour Street in Soho, London. One of the resident performers at this time was the incredibly cool and popular Georgie Fame

who like the Mods and American GI’s that used to frequently go there – was a huge fan of jazz, r& b and ska. Consequently it was a melting pot of all that was exciting in a post war Britain. Multiracial, happy and free to enjoy all that was great. This was the “Modernist” time. And that is what my poem conveys.

Here is my poem Down At The Flamingo

This poem is in my book Jazz Poetry – Improvisations in Language.

Available here :

Jazz Poetry – Improvisations in Language

Beat, Blues and the Rhythm Of Fools / and Howling Wolves

The second book in my music trilogy – Beat, Blues and the Rhythm Of Fools is a book of poetry that takes inspiration from blues music and is perhaps a collection that is closer too my true self than some of my other works. Writer Jason Brummell states it is:

“Unashamed in its emotional nakedness”

This I believe to be true. I am after all a thoughtful poet sharing spontaneous verse in the typical Beat tradition. Although I am inspired by the many elements of British subcultures–mainly the Modernist scene of the fifties and sixties, but,to be honest- having been brought up in the seventies and eighties there are elements of Punk angst, and the Hippy ambience of the Acid Jazz/ early House music Raver evident in my ramblings. I am after all some sort of subculturalist sponge. I’m like a Magpie that steals all that glitters in the orbit of my inspirations in life. Music is my key. It unlocks my thought processes and this is evident throughout all my work. I don’t have any profound plans – I just write – just as I am now- letting the words reveal something. Jason Brummell the author of two fantastic Mod Fiction novels All About My Girl and All Or Nothing which are available Here at Suave Collective Publishing very kindly provided a foreword too this book. His foreword which I am providing for you to read in a moment shows my love of Jazz which is evident in the rhythms of my writing – although Blues music is mainly the subject matter for this collection- or I should say topics found in great Blues tunes but not exclusively – for there are also -post Brexit and semi political poems revealing my unhappiness of the state of life these days – but that does not mean to say that this collection is completely maudlin or just one big whinge about the state of things. For there are as always elements of hope and change in my work. Here is the complete foreword to this book which is available to buy now from Amazon

Foreword

I feel I’ve known Jason, a lifetime although in truth possibly just a couple of years. He has an appreciation of the finer cuts of cloth in life and wears his passions on his well tailored sleeves. He is sincere and empathetic and like much in his life he does it for the simple pleasure of it and hopes that it reaches out and connects. Perhaps that’s why I feel I’ve known him longer; his poetry and his word play lay his thoughts bare, it is Unashamed in its emotional nakedness.We used to call this “Honesty” perhaps an increasingly old-School virtue, now somewhat lost amid the machinations of political smokeand media mirrors and an unresponsive population happy to be spoon-fed both false idols and villains.

Jason’s word play takes its lead from the late 50’s Beats, with a knowing nod to the Liverpool poets of the 60’s but isn’t confined to the past. It’s about the here and now, the free and the how to be, with it’s deft interplay of. meter. and. space. that is…

…equally reminiscent….

…of modal shifts…

… in Modern…

…Jazz (another clear passion)

… no wonder when the same raw “feel” and spiritualism that drove Coltrane and Miles to peel back the layers of grime and let the purest of light illuminate and cleanse the darkest worlds and minds. Jason’s poetry attempts the same and much like his Jazz idols attempt to shed a positive call for change rather than raging against an uncaring machine. Sometimes the reach is too far, but the words remain as they are… for that is truth…

…. that is honesty

Jason Brummell August 2016

Lastly

I feel it only be right I share one of my poems from this collection. Naturally I understand poetry doesn’t have a huge market – but if you like what you have read in this blog – feel free to comment and maybe treat yourself or someone to a copy of this book which I am proud of.Here is Songs of Blues

Something I wrote whilst listening to Howlin’ Wolf

Songs of Blues play on the highways

Making waves in your mind

Makingwavesinyourmind

Takingyoursoulonajourneytounwind

Stop!

Wait a minute!

Rewind.

The Blues tell you a story

One that is defined

Making a tale of sadness

Head along a new road

A road of understanding

Whereas the Blues man sings

A life takes wings

Harsh tales of love and sacrifice

Being down and out

The oppression

Depression

A lesson.

A lover scorned

A Devil’s doom warned.

Dangers

Deceptions of the heart.

All brought together by guitars and harps –

And howling Wolves.

Maudlin moments of acknowledgement

Making your head nod

To a beat of repetition

And the call and response of a spiritual.

Oh baby do you understand?

Do you know where I’m coming from?

Be it a field or a chain gang.

And alleyways of desolated moonshine.

The Blues are here and now

Listen or it don’t mean a thing.

Don’t take your superstition

With the derision

Of the gloom.

Hear the light and shade.

Appreciate the good things.

Yes!

Just move on.

Take your soul in a journey to unwind.

Respite of The Blues

You can be on top of the world when you are feeling blue. Juxtaposed tunes of driving rhythm with lyrics of sad lives.

Yeah

That’s The Blues

Hearing of lives messed up as mine

U-turns

To a time from before

But memories perspiring from every pore.

I’m just a pore boy.

You see?

Stop!

Wait a minute!

Rewind

Something is

Making waves in my mind.

Soon I’ll have another story –

You’ll see.

No master how hard life can be.

Jason Disley (2016)

News: Modernist Beat @ Stanza Extravaganza

My first headline gig after just over a year of performing!

Yes I am honoured to announce that I will be headlining at this month’s Stanza Extravaganza at the Artizan Gallery in Torquay, Devon. I will be reading a selection of poems from my new collection Songs of Benevolence & Rageplus other poems from previous collections with the addition of music. As well as my performance there will be performances from a number of local poets. Providing an eclectic mix of wonderful spoken word. For me this is a landmark opportunity as I never imagined a couple of years ago that I would have reached this point – or even have the confidence to do such a thing. Yet- here I am! Inspired by Beat Poets, I am actually following their lead and sharing my work not just through a written page – but actually by standing up and sharing my words in a much more resonating style. Robert Garnham has called me a ” laid back” performer. This maybe so as I am not a shouter – but I do like to think that my passion is evident in my words and delivery. Music plays a big part in my work. This will be evident on this evening as it is something that those who have seen me perform are aware of. Here is a video of one of the poems from my new collection:

This particular evening will also serve as my official book launch for Songs Of Benevolence & Rage

Which you can buy here:
Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

Songs of Benevolence & Rage, and Modernist Beat

From the time I started turning my hand to poetry, it was clear that my influences were writers, and musicians firmly placed in that world of “The Cool” I was inspired by Jazz loving Beatniks and the Original Beat Generation writers, but also by Gil Scott Heron, the jazz- hip hop style of Galliano, British musician Paul Weller, The lyricism Of Curtis Mayfield, Isaac Hayes etc. I could go on and on. Even now I can be clearly influenced by what I define as “cool” Obviously what I term “Cool” is subjective. But, the point is, is that these things that shape me as a person, whether it be stylistically, musically or even literally are things that I have admired, sometimes trying to emulate in some way (more often than not failing), that which drives me. It has allowed me to discover myself. Maybe I am a little obsessive, and even insecure- but if it wasn’t for what I have discovered on my personal “road trip” I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing now. In 1996 I wrote a very slim collection of poetry titled The New Beat Generation. This title came from a poem I had written. It’s not a ground shaking Howl or a great opus. It was just a call for something to happen. The writers I admire are the ones that say things as they are, and highlight things that are sometimes wrong, or are so perfectly wonderful that there should be more of it. Things can be fickle and fast moving, or languishing in a luxurious state of enrichment, enlightenment and wellbeing. It could be simple or not – but we are signposted by their eloquence to put into words or music that which needs to be said.

Here is:

The New Beat Generation

Remember the Beat Generation?

Black rollnecks and shades, Jazz clubs and blades

Open minds and open hearts

On the Road is where Jack Kerouac starts

Take his example

Take to the highway

New sights and sounds

Interests with no bounds

Lap it all up like a bowl of cream

Make this reality realise it’s dream

Look and observe different lives come and go

Enjoy, recognise and learn to know

The Beat Generation knew the score –

And after all what are our lives for?

The time has come for a New Beat Generation

The time has come for a New Beat Generation

Where excess beats moderation

And love rules over the nation.

Peace.

Jason Disley (1995)

That poem was the catalyst too my endeavours as a poet. Roll on to the present day and my style has evolved as it naturally would, although my ideas of influences remain the same. I am constantly looking for inspiration from somewhere.

Now for me as an individual the call for The New Beat Generation is long gone. There are many great poets and artists out there. Each generation brings about their voice. Some are heard, like say Kate Tempest for example, who is very popular these days. Others are heard more locally in their own areas – all spreading their words, some are full of angst, some are full of romance, but all are full of passion. But, moving on and back to what I write. Many that know me know what my influences are – and this is where Modernist Beat comes in. I am in many ways a product of my own influences, like a sponge I soak in what enthrals me. I then take it in the direction I want. I write being true to myself. Serving up spontaneous verse that reveals where my head is at, at that time. Sometimes it works, sometimes it may not. But my efforts are always about creating something. Poetry is my thing. Not everyone will understand it, not everyone will appreciate it. Some will think it’s namby pamby nonsense. But to those who do read my work, I hope that there is something they recognise and identify with. These days like the Original Beats, I get to perform. Something a couple of years I never thought I’d ever do. But it is the natural progression. It is the evolving path I find myself on.

My new book Songs of Benevolence & Rage is a collection in two parts. It shows that I am still as angst ridden as I was when I was in my twenties when I started writing, but it also shows how I perhaps understand life a little better.

There are poems about enlightenment, love, war, frustration, kindness, thankfulness, loss, anger and the needs for change. All brought together to give you -as fellow poet Robert Garnham writes –

a fantastic collection of heart and feeling, which leaves the reader genuinely uplifted

Songs of Benevolence & Rage is available for £7.99

Here

So for now – The New Beat has become The Modernist Beat, and I hope to continue to evolve. and maybe other writers will join me along the way.

Jason Disley (February 2018)

February News! Modernist BEAT:

Well! Things are getting more exciting- I have my new collection of poetry out now and it is currently available at Lulu.com

It is a collection titled: Songs of Benevolence & Rage. It is my sixth collection and will be available via other online retailers soon. If you are interested in any of my work feel free to contact me via the contact page on this site.  This collection is a book in two parts and has a foreword written by Robert Garnham, a very well respected performance poet, who has performed extensively throughout the UK as well as New York and Germany.  Here is what Robert has to say about the book:

“This is a fantastic collection of heart and feeling, which leaves the reader genuinely uplifted. Jason finds joy in the world in spite of his rage, and, as he writes, ‘I do not look to the future, nor back in anger, I breathe the now’, which is as good a philosophy as any. It’s great to know that the spirit of the Beat poets, the jazz mystics, the dreamers and the believers, is still going strong in the work of  Jason Disley. Luxuriate dear reader in this book, and let him take you to ethereal places.”

Robert Garnham

 

product_thumbnail

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

 

I also have had the real pleasure of continued work on my forthcoming collaboration with Rick Blackman on the “Speakeasy” spoken word album. I am thrilled to say that it is heading in a very real and exciting direction. With contributions from other writers and artists whose work I greatly admire. I wish I could say who they are  -but at this point all I can say is this album will be very different and will have a great international feel with a 1960’s vibe. Once the final mixes are in the bag -I will obviously share more information here.  The Speakeasy album is a real collaboration with my poetry being at its core -but, is vastly enhanced by the great music and the scene it depicts.

 

Other news is that I will be performing a slot at Stanza Extravaganza which is held at The Artizan Gallery, Lucius Street, Torquay once a month on the 26th. At this event I hope to perform one or two poems from my new collection and maybe another piece I have recently written.

Two days ago I had the pleasure of meeting The Vinyl Avengers at one of their enjoyable evenings of  Mod, Soul and Ska -and was asked if I would like to perform at one of their events this coming Easter. Naturally I said yes -the performance is for a cause that is one that many will see as worthwhile. The Teenage Cancer Trust. Every year those who enjoy the Mod scene will know that each March nationwide there are events to raise money. These events are called  The March Of The Mods, and this will be my second time appearing at one of these events. The  first being last  March in Paignton where I read my poem Down At The Flamingo with the fantastic Mod Anthem Green Onions playing in the background.  To be asked back again is  rewarding.

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That’s all for now. I will share more news next week. Feel  free to contact me for any more information. Jason Disley